About Me

I am an environmental and development economist in the economics department at the University of New Hampshire. My research: (1) builds and analyzes spatial bioeconomic models in both developed- and developing-economy settings and (2) informs policy amid spatial processes and externalities. I estimate the consequences of neglecting spatial, ecological, or behavioral components when determining welfare impacts from an invasive species or infectious disease using optimization, modeling, and simulation methods in QGIS, R, GAMS, and Matlab. I have presented my research in several settings including the ASSA and WCERE conferences. Ongoing agricultural policy research includes experience performing field research in developing economies.

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Prior to my current appointment as an Assistant Professor of Economics at UNH, I worked as an Economic Research Assistant at the FDIC and served as an interim Instructor of Economics at Baker University. I hold a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wyoming, a M.A. in applied economics from Western Kentucky University, and a B.S. in business from Baker University. My teaching experience extends to all levels of undergraduates and graduates, and my interests include - but are not limited to: microeconomics,  environmental and natural resource economics, development economics, and game theory. 

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​In my free time, I like to run (jog might actually be more accurate), rock climb, travel, and volunteer. I recently visited Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, where I enjoyed hiking, chatting with fellow economists, and eating maybe a few too many danishes. Last but certainly not least, I love watching (or listening) to Cardinal baseball and Blues hockey. Go Cards and Long Live the Note! 

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To learn more, feel free to follow any one of the links below.

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